Sunday, January 19, 2020

The Scots Magazine II, June 1740 - Vauxhall & Inclement Weather

To the author of the SCOTS MAGAZINE.
London, May 17, 1740.
SIR,
                 THE inclemency of the season has ruined the whole Beau-monde; our spring-cloaths have been, for two months, hanging on solitary wooden pins: while our thick, rough, heavy, cross-button'd coats, have press'd our shoulders, till the summer calls us from town, though our new cuts have seen neither Kensington-gardens, Hyde-park, nor the Mall. —Nay, the only evening that has yet seem'd favourable I slipt to Vaux-hall, but I vow to G - , before I had stepp'd the walks quite round, I was blown through and through, in such a manner, as to drink four full glasses of French wine, before I knew I was alive. And, in that cold condition, as returning by water would have endanger'd my life, I was forced to be shook in a most unmerciful hack, till one half of my joints were distorted, and the other bruised to a jelly. If the weather does not mend very quickly, I see no avoiding new winter-coats, and ordering my gard'ner to come to London to stir my fire; for, what with cold and idleness, to be sure the poor fellow is starv'd to death in the country.

                 It may not be amiss to tell you, the spirit of imitation increases amongst us every day. Vaux-hall has produced tickets and accommodations of the same nature, at Marybone, on this side of the Thames; and at Cuper's gardens, on t'other: —and at Marble-hall, near Vaux-hall, a ball is established to relieve us from the necessity of coming home at ten; where parties bent on pleasure, may be favour'd with an opportunity of sitting up till day-light, amidst company enough to keep them awake.

                    The cut of our sleeves varies not much from last year, in general; though some Gentlemen strive to introduce a small dog's ear, which I do not think genteel. Our hat-brims increase, and the crowns deepen a little; to suit a camp, I believe; for we fall most amazingly into warlike apparel, a cockade being become as essential a part of dress as a perriwig.—White stockings reign, in spite of dirty weather; and Spensers have push'd our ties almost out of sight; the former being now worn by Gentlemen of fifty, to the great advantage of the thin cheek.

                    The Ladies are, if it be possible, less settled in their spring-fashions than we. As the weather requires flower'd silks, few are used; and 'tis most diverting to behold a brisk young Lady in a thin lutestring gown, covered up, neck and shoulders, with a lined velvet handkerchief, loaded with lace! Perriwigs are in great use with the Ladies, and there was, t'other day, a dispute at White's, whether we should not, by way of reprisal, take intirely to our own hair? Sacks are yet admired for hiding ANY imperfection of the shape: and broad straw hats ty'd like the milk-maids, are permitted to shade the finest features in the three kingdoms.

                    I have had a most intolerable inclination toward fighting, ever since the commencement of the present war; and once or twice almost resolved upon purchasing a commission; —by my money I mean, for I have some doubt whether my services to my country would be sufficient. —But what has prevented my putting on a sash, has, principally, been a fear of becoming a laughing-stock to the whole circuit of my acquaintance: for, such is at present the disreputation of peaceable soldiers, that if it be not soon their good fortune to be sent abroad, I know no possible way of retrieving their characters, but by beating one another's brains out, to convince the world they are not afraid of fighting. —But, in all likelihood, there will be no occasion for that; we may have employment enough abroad: for I can't tell what to think of France; and, should she declare against us, the land-men may be wanted. —But, till then, I will wave all thoughts of a commission; being determined, if ever I put on a soldier's face, and leave the fair circle of the boxes, to do it only in the road of fame; which I doubt not pursuing with as much vigour as ever I yet did the voice of pleasure. —I hope you are fashionable enough to toast the West-India hero; for, I am persuaded his name has had its full effect here, more than ten thousand pretty fellows, at a moderate computation, having got drunk to the short tune of ADMIRAL VERNON; so zealous are we in our country's cause!
I am, &c.  S. TOUPEE.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

The Scots Magazine, 1739 - Vauxhall Ladies & Arbor Paintings

Scots Magazine, June 28, 1739

SIR,
             After the piece of musick is finish'd, a silence ensues, of a length sufficient to allow the company time to take a circuit of the gardens before another begins; which is the same before each piece; and those intervals are chiefly employed in visiting the walks, remarking the company, and viewing the paintings, which have been put up the last spring to protect the Ladies, while sitting in the arbours, from catching cold in their necks by the inclemency of the evening breezes. —These paintings forming something like three parts of a square, the Prince's pavilion (so called in honour of his Royal Highness, who always honours that place with his presence when he visits these gardens) and the house belonging to the manager, form the fourth. In the middle of this square, which takes up about a fourth part of the gardens, stands a beautiful orchestra for the band of musick, which consists of the best hands upon every instrument in modern use: and from that a little bridge of four or five yards reaches to an elegant edifice, wherein is placed an excellent organ; which has lately been fitted to several new pieces of entertainment, particularly a symphony of singing birds, which never fails to meet with the loud applauses of all present. Many little novelties are contrived to yield a greater variety to the audience on the other instruments; and a set of small bells have been introduced in a tune which meets with a very favourable reception—The walks leading close by the front of the arbours, (each of which is large enough to entertain ten or twelve persons to supper) the paintings at the back of every arbour afford a very entertaining view; especially when the Ladies, as ought ever to be contrived, sit with their heads against them. And, what adds not a little to the pleasure of these pictures, they give an unexceptionable opportunity of gazing on any pleasing fair-one, without any other pretence than the credit of a fine taste for the piece behind her. —To preserve these pieces from the weather, they are fixed so as to be in cases, contrived on purpose, from the close of the entertainment every night, to the fifth tune of the evening following; after which, in an instant, they all fall down; and, from an open rural view, the eye is relieved by the agreeable surprise of some of the most favourite fancies of our poets in the most remarkable scenes of our comedies, some of the celebrated dancers, &c. in their most remarkable attitudes, several of the childish diversions, and other whims that are well enough liked by most people at a time they are disposed to smile, and every thing of a light kind, and tending to unbend the thoughts, has an effect desired before it is felt.

                    By the time the next piece is begun, the gardens being pretty full, the company crowd round the musick; and, by being forced to stand close, have an opportunity of taking a strict observation of every face near, and, as it frequently happens, of picking out companions for the remaining part of the -------- evening. —Sir John Trot points out to his Lady, who has not before crossed the water for twenty years, the motion of the Gentleman who beats time, the manly strokes of the kettle-drummer, and the wonderful strength of lungs with which Mr S--- sounds the trumpet. The Petit Maitres, at the beginning of a solo on the last mention'd instrument, fixing their toes in a proper position, pull out their snuff-boxes; and, after an emphatical nod at setting off, take a pinch in exact time; till the martial notes raising, by slow degrees, their untried courage, they discharge the whole force of their valour upon the eyes of the Ladies who stand next them; who, generally, receive their fire with great resolution, and make a defence often fatal to the assailants. - Mrs Flimsy finds in the softer musick something so like the ravishing softness of the Italian opera's, that, in an extasy of pleasure at the bewitching [p.364] notes, she is upon the point of falling, when the young Lord Shallow, with a complaisance hereditary in his family, interposing his kind hand, startles her with an agreeable surprize, and occasions as many apologies for the freedom on one hand, and acknowledgements for the obligation on the other, as, by a mutual display of the most engaging rhetorick, lay the foundation of an acquaintance that lasts, perhaps, for some hours. —Gentlemen who come alone are open to the overtures of any amiable companion, and Ladies who venture without a masculine guide, are not, generally speaking, averse to the company of a polite protector. —The musick again ceasing, and dusk approaching, the green walks are filled; at the termination of which stands a man in the posture of a Constable, to protect the Ladies from any insult, &c. and at the bottom of the grand walks, by the help of a ha-ha wall, the top of which, standing in a trench, is on a level with the ground, the prospect is open to the country, and a hideous figure of Aurora on a pedestal interrupts, I cannot say terminates the view. Soft whispers begin now to murmur thro' the trees; and, the shade of evening favouring the Ladies with a convenience of blushing without being perceived, or of avoiding any hard thought for omitting that pleasing mark of innocence on occasions when it may happen to be expected, the lofty trees, which form a grove that must be called delightful, and every fanning breeze, by waving the garments of the sylvan Deities (the only ones we know) yield a double delight, and resemble, as much as we can guess at this distance of time, the most delightful scenes of old Arcadia: And when the musick plays at a distance, so as to be heard thro' the leaves in one connected sound, without any distinction of one instrument from another, the inchanting harmony produces a pleasure scarce to be equalled by nature, not easy to be conceived in imagination; - and I cannot help confessing that, according to what I can judge from my own experience, the breast must be a stranger to the soft passion that feels not a tender bias to love, and a powerful one indeed if any object of affection chance to be near; for every return of the artful symphony thro' any chance vacancy of the grove, fresh fans the glowing flame, and irresistibly increases the influence of the fair-one, who yet has more charms added by every melting effect the melody has on her mind and gesture. In this situation, if soft ideas prevail more than elsewhere, those only will wonder at it whose minds are proof against Cupid's painful delight, and whose ears are deaf to the power of harmony, and arm'd against all the accidental motives to love that are apt to prevail upon a mind bent on pleasure. —A few turns round the shades make the Ladies glad to think of sitting down to rest themselves; and the Gentlemen assiduously seek the most agreeable arbours to regale them with a repast suitable in elegance to the elevation of their ideas; which usually happening about nine o'clock, the description thereof will naturally fall into the next letter you receive from,
SIR, Your humble servant, S. TOUPEE.

Monday, January 13, 2020

The Scots Magazine, I, July 1739 - Early Evening at Vauxhall


The Scots Magazine, May 28. 1739


SIR,
                 We find so much difficulty, at present, to render this season of the year tolerable, in point of pleasure and entertainment, that there is some difficulty in accounting for that chearfulness which we meet with in the writings of our forefathers on the approach of spring, and the evening breezes of June and July: for, so far are the beau monde from prizing the charms which nature has so long disclosed, without any variation, that the simple woods and groves, the meads and purling streams, have lost the power to please: And the additions made to these, to render them more capable of yielding delight, are such, as for many centuries were judged ridiculous in themselves, and irreconcileable with our genius and clime: but thanks to the assistance of some kind visitors from other nations, we have surmounted the difficulties nature and custom have laid in our way, and Italian ridotto's have been seen amongst us, spite of the inclemency of evening damps or British rusticity.

                    The annual improvements in Vaux-Hall gardens, and the great resort of personages of the first rank, have, for the five last years, drawn a multitude of people together every fine evening during the entertainment of those honoured walks; and the practice of having tickets for the season, to admit two persons every night, does not a little add to the number of the company, by putting it in a Gentleman's power, for so small a charge, to oblige his friends with so generally approved an amusement. The price of admittance, without a ticket, is one shilling for each person; from which last article alone it is computed, that, one night with another, not less than one thousand shillings are received each evening of performance during the season.

                    Your distance from a kind of entertainment so new amongst us, and so much approved, especially by the Ladies, may make an account of it acceptable to such of your readers as have a taste for polite amusements: —Wherefore, in order to give a more perfect idea of the time spent in this fashionable diversion, the most natural method I can think of, will be to divide the three hours, usually bestowed on a visit to this melodious grove, into separate articles, and under each to give the truest description I can of the manner in which it is employed. - It will not be amiss to apprise you of its lying on the other side of the river from London and Westminster, about a mile from the first mentioned city. —The three hours are those from seven till ten.

The First Hour

ABOUT Westminster and Whitehall stairs, barges with six or four oars each, attend (hired, most of them, at ten shillings for the barge, and a crown each oar for the evening) till the Ladies have done tea: by the help of coaches, chairs, &c. about seven they arrive at the water-side; and with many expressions, and some apprehension of danger, they are, by the aid of the Gentlemen who accompany them, and the watermens assistance, got on board; and Tom, who generally can blow the French horn, is placed exactly with his back against his Lady's shoulders. The putting off the barge from shore occasions several Oh's! and gives opportunity for any kind fair-one to distinguish her favourite by a close cling to his side, and a pinch in the arm. —After repeated cautions to the watermen to take care, the vessel leaves the shore; and the air proves sharp enough to oblige the Ladies to vail their necks by the envious cloud of a handkerchief, tied with such a designed carelessness, as gives even a grace to that impertinent screen of beauty.—Tom plays an air from the last new Opera; and the company regale themselves with a glass of citron or plague-water, or ratafie; and Miss Kitty, by mamma's command, sings the last song her master, Sig. C-----i taught her, with the applause of all present; her papa being engaged elsewhere for the evening. —Several boats with young Gentlemen only, approach within oar-length, and ogle the Ladies; who, with a pleas'd disdain, correct their freedom; and both agreeably part, in hope of a second interview in the gardens.

                    At Somerset (the place to take water from Covent-Garden) and the Temple stairs, a number of young fellows are hurrying into boats; who, though they set out by themselves, seldom return without female companions.

                    At all the stairs from the Temple down to the Bridge the watermen are busily employed in taking their company on board; which consists of various degrees. Sir John, from Fenchurch-street, with his Lady and whole family of children, is attended by a footman, with a hand-basket well cramm'd with provisions for the voyage. The boat sallies a little at setting off; but the Knight laughs at the fear of his spouse and the young Ladies his daughters, declaring, the danger that scares them to be nothing, compared with what he came through in his last voyage from Oporto. Misses give an entertaining account of dress and choice of partners at the last city-ball; which, tho' mamma smiles at, Sir John corrects, with doubting whether they give equal attention to the sermons they hear; which his youngest daughter answers prettily enough, by assuring him, for her sisters and self, that they do not take more notice of people in any place whatever than at church. —My Lady grows sick; a glass of wine and drops (no water being in the boat) is instantly given her; and on her recovery, eldest Miss cuts the cake, and distributes it among the company, and a glass of wine is drank round.

                    At the next stairs, Mr William, an apprentice in Cheapside, by the contrivance of her confident, who accompanies them, is taking water with Miss Suckey, his master's daughter, who is supposed to be gone next door to drink tea, and he to meet an uncle coming out of the country. The thought of having deceived the old people makes them laugh immoderately along the street, and almost totter over the boat instead of getting into it. They are no sooner seated, and got from shore, with hearty wishes that they may meet nobody that knows them, than the Ladies find, one of them through hurry had forgotten her handkerchief, and the other her snuff-box. The subject that employs them the whole passage is the admirable thought and contrivance that brought them out with such secrecy. —The watermen beg leave to stop to drink, which is denied, on account of their not having seen the gardens this year, and being obliged, at all events, to reach home by ten.

                    An honest old mechanick and his spouse come next. He assures her his Royal Highness himself favours Vaux-Hall with his presence almost every week; and that it is said to be so much improved since he was a young man, that he was resolved to see what new-fangled notions they had got now-a-days, to exceed what were in fashion then. He gives the watermen some drink, asks their names, whether they are married or single, how many children they have alive, &c. which, with the frequent interruption of observations on the companies that overtake them, and descriptions of the barges they pass by, fills up the time of their voyage.

                    Being all landed, they proceed in cavalcade, through a lane of watermen, to the entrance of the gardens; where, (no dogs being admitted) (1) after Chlo is huff'd by one passage-keeper, Pug beat by another, and Pompey scar'd by a third, they are all trusted to the care of their several watermen; and after shewing tickets, or paying money, the Ladies and Gentlemen walk in, survey the coop made to keep the footmen in, just at the door, take a hasty circuit round the walks, the paintings not being yet let down, take a view of Handel's bust, curiously carved on a fine block of marble, and plac'd on one side of the garden, striking his lyre:- but before they have observed half its beauties, the musick striking up, the whole company crowd from every part of the gardens toward the orchestra and organ; which gives a fair opportunity of meeting one's acquaintance, and remarking what beaus, bells, and beauties are present, a part of the diversion as agreeable as any to,
Sir, your humble servant, S. TOUPEE.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

The Scots Magazine, I, Sept 1739 - Vauxhall at the End of the Night

The Scots Magazine, I, Sept 1739 - Vauxhall at the End of the Night

July 31, 1739 - The last Hour.
SIR,
                 The chief part of the company having seated themselves in the arbours, five hundred separate suppers are served in an instant: and as a proper judgement of this entertainment cannot be fully formed without a knowledge of the expence attending it, it may be necessary to inform you, that the prices of provisions are printed, and fixed up in several parts of the gardens, to prevent the guests from being imposed upon by the waiters; each of whom has a number painted upon a small tin plate, and fastned to his breast, on the out-side of his coat, and a certain number of tables committed to his charge, being obliged to pay at the bar for every thing as he has it. —The price of a bottle of French claret is 5s. of one cold chicken 2s.6d. quart of cyder 1s. quart of small-bear 4d. slice of bread 2d. of cheese 4d. and every thing else in proportion, which raises an elegant collation to a high rate. —But that is not much thought of here; the musick plays, the Ladies look pleased, and the Gentlemen forget the expence, by having their minds busied upon thoughts more delightful.

                    Glass candlesticks with wax lights are mostly used; and, with the addition of the china dishes, plates, &c. in which every thing is served up, greatly increase the beauty and elegance of the cover'd tables. —I must confess when this custom of supping before the publick first came in fashion, I was far from approving it: but powerful use has familiarized it; and we are now no more surprised to behold a young Lady dissect a pigeon, or swallow a plate of ham before three thousand people, than to see her take a pinch of snuff at church. Tarts, custards, cheese-cakes, &c. are supplyed the younger company in great perfection; and, with the power of a few glasses of wine, the men grow more complaisant and not less amorous, the Ladies lose some of the constraint under which their eyes before laboured, and a chearful freedom spreads itself through the place.

                    The night grows cold, and towards the close of the entertainment, some of the best pieces of musick are performed with the utmost skill and care, in order to leave the stronger impression upon the audience of the elegance of the entertainment. The more considerate part of the company think of getting upon the water on their return home before the crowd at the water-side is too great. When the musick ceases for the evening, the chill of the night hurries the company to the water-side, through a lane of watermen, each waiting for his passengers, who generally call by name the men who brought them thither. The throng on the edge of the water is so great, that it is with much difficulty the Ladies can be handed to their seats: the boats, by pressing all to land at a time, (the place for stepping in being scarce big enough for ten to lie conveniently, though frequently more than four hundred attend) keep one another in a continual coggling motion, and often endanger oversetting; though seldom any other mischief is done beside the breaking some watermens heads, and the bottoms of boats, poles, oars, &c. —In this hurry and confusion some miss of their boats, and others rush into such as are at hand without enquiry. On these occasions words often arise, and sometimes not without just cause: for you must acknowledge it highly provoking, between 10 and 11 o'clock, at such a distance from home, to see the boat one provided to return in, cram'd full of other people, who force the watermen to leave you, without a prospect of crossing the water all night, unless by chance, for most exorbitant hire, you get some boat to give you a cast to the other side, after which, many have a mile to trudge before a coach can be got to ease the fatigue of the journey.

                    But to return to the stairs at Vaux-hall: Most of the boats being hired, it is very common to see a polite Gentleman begging room for a Lady, or for himself: and some young fellows with a glass extraordinary in their heads, take a pleasure in following any Lady they affect to admire, into whatever boat she enters, and, sometimes, maintain their ground sword in hand: tho' I must confess, how gallant soever such actions may appear to the fair-sex, they are too rude to be calmly approved of; especially by Gentlemen to whom these insults are offer'd, who are under a necessity either of disputing with a stranger at the hazard of every life in the boat, or of sitting to be pester'd with his impertinence to the end of their little voyage, and thereby do a real service where a toss overboard would be more critically just.

                    Most of the boats have a covering over them; and the silence of the night is interrupted by nothing but the sound of a few French horns, and the tedious groaning of the oars. The Ladies now earnestly desire to reach home, and the Gentlemen find enough to do in diverting them from giving too much attention to the cold that now very sensibly seizes their tender shoulders: A song is of some use here; though it is frequently succeeded by a yawning chorus.

                    The landing is attended with no danger or trouble, unless at Westminster, or Whitehall stairs, where there is sometimes a little hurry; at the others people go on shore with great deliberation, when the nights are dark, and gladly stretch their legs, which are commonly benumm'd and crippled by the shallowness of the boats used on this river.

                    You see, Sir, our journey to Vaux-hall is a human enjoyment; having fatigue enough attending it to heighten the entertainment. I was going to recommend an imitation of it near Edinburgh: but, perhaps your evenings are too cold, and luxury within better bounds than with us; for tho' Vaux-hall certainly must please most men, yet I know not whether the money laid out upon it be of proportionable use to the publick. 
I am, SIR, Your very humble servant, S. TOUPEE.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

1739 A Trip to Vauxhall - The Scots Magazine

The Scots Magazine, Vol. I, November 1739, Poetical Essays

OH! let me, Thames, along thy surface glide,
And waft me smoothly on thy swelling tide;
Bear me, oh! bear me to the peaceful grove,
The Shades of 
Vaux-Hall, and the courts of love;
Those fragrant bowers where art and nature vie,
Whose shady walks delight the ravish'd eye.
                 The 
Paphian Queen forsakes her fav'rite seat,
And rears new temples in this lov'd retreat:
Here 
Cupid's arrows more successful prove,
While beauty warms, and musick melts to love;
In these soft scenes he takes the surest aim,
Where all things round promote the pleasing flame.
                 At distance see th'
Idalian state appear.—
Hark! through the grove magic sounds I hear.
Care, hatred, envy, all are left behind,
With ev'ry passion that disturbs the mind:
Pleasure receives us with her jovial train,
And smiling Plenty strives to entertain. -
Here pause a while, with wonder and surprise,
And mark the beauties singly as they rise.

                 Th'extensive visto thro' the walk pursue,
The straight perspective lengthening to the view:
Here trace the winding thro' the artless shade,
There see the wide extending colonade!
The twining grove for contemplation form'd,
The gay pavilion splendidly adorn'd:
Or in the winding maze intently stray,
While warbling nightingales around you play;
In more melodious notes they learn to sing,
Join in the consort, and salute the spring.
In these cool shades the happy couples rove,
And the coy youth oft dares to whisper love;
While some persuasive, soft, inchanting air,
To kind compliance melts the tender fair.
The Statesman here to mirth and pleasure yields;
The Poet wanders in
 Elysian fields;
The gay, the grave, the sprightly, and severe,
All, all alike find something pleasing here.
                 Behold! from ev'ry walk the nimble fair
Trip round th'orchestra at some fav'rite air.—
But hark! what slow, what solemn sounds are these,
Which wake our grief, and make even sorrow please!
Can sounds such lively images impart!
Can musick sway thus powerful o'er the heart!
Unhappy 
Saul* thy fate we're taught to mourn,
And bend in silent sorrow round thy urn.

Let Orpheus boast his lyre, and matchless skill,
Who drew the brutes obedient to his will;
The stones assembled at Amphion's call,
Danc'd into form, and built the 
Theban wall:
Thy art, resistless, can alike engage,

HANDEL! thou Orpheus of the present age!
Loud in these woods may thy soft strains resound,
And mimic 
Echo catch the dying sound!
                 But now in shades the envious night descends,
And o'er the grove her sable wing extends.
Fly 
Morpheus hence, thy ebon sceptre sway
O'er the dull race who dream their time away:
Be theirs to sleep; but let us waking prove
The charms of beauty, and the sweets of love;
While from each tree darts forth a steady ray,
And pays us doubly for the loss of day.
A thousand stars thro' the thick wood are seen,
Dance in thy shades and twinkle thro' thy green;
Each lofty elm in twining alcoves grows,
And o'er our heads a painted sky compose;
And now, dispers'd, they taste the friendly bowl,
Wine chears the heart, and musick warms the soul.
Thus 
Venus, Bacchus and Apollo join
In one kind aim, and all to please combine.
May no descending dew, no boistrous shower,
Drive thy bright beauties from the tufted bower;
                 May no loud thunder interrupt their joy,
No nimble lightning with swift flash destroy;
But thou, pale moon! whose clearer beams delight,
Diffuse thy mildness o'er the face of night.

* Alluding to Handel's King Saul, an oratorio

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

1738 Trip to Vauxhall Gardens - A Stolen Heart

A Trip to Vauxhall; print; William Humphrey 1772; London

As I was one Morning coming down Stairs, a Gentleman, in a great deal of Confusion, ask’d me if my Name was not Stonecastle, and if I was not Author of the Universal Spectator; on my telling him that I was, with a trembling Hand he gave me a Paper, and with a faltering Voice desired me to insert it in my very next Journal, for his Life depended on it; then made a low Bow, and retir’d: I have granted his Request by publishing the following Advertisement, and hope it will be of Service to him. 

STOLEN or STRAY’D on Monday the 5th Instant, in the Evening, at Vaux-Hall; a large Old-Fashion’d Heart, let round with several Antique Jewels. Viz. Constancy, Truth, Sincerity and Good Humour, with a small Parcel of Wit fix’d in the Middle, and secur’d with Gold; Whoever may have it in Possession, is desir’d to advertise where the Owner may call, and have it restor’d.


N.B. A tall young Lady in Purple is violently suspected, and is therefore desir’d to peruse this Advertisement; and if guilty, to take Means of doing the injur’d Owner Justice. It can be of no Use to her, unless the Gentleman who lost this Heart instructs her how to manage it.


Gentleman’s Magazine Vol. 8 June 1738: p. 299

Sunday, January 5, 2020

1738 Vaux-hall Gardens

Caution recommended in the Choice of our Diversions. Lucinda's Case. Vaux-Hall Gardens, &c.

I cannot conclude without taking some Notice of the Diversion of the Year: The Multitudes who resort daily to Vaux-Hall make it necessary to say somewhat upon that Entertainment.

The Gardens are prettily disposed, and when illumined make a beautiful Scene; the Variety of Company differently employ'd, the Contrast between the instrumental Musick in the middle Grove, and the natural Harmony of the Woods, in the more retired Parts, render the Whole a very agreeable Amusement. As I am in Hopes too the Warbling of the Nightingales, and the Verdure of the Trees, may tend to reclaim to a Toleration of the Country such of the Fair Sex as are at this Time preparing to leave this Metropolis, I am contented to let them go thither, but under the following Restrictions, viz.


That their Parties always consist of an odd Number. There is something in the Garden which so much resembles the Description of a Mahometan Paradise, that perhaps, if they should be suffered to go in Pairs, they may be tempted to imitate all the Diversions of such a Place. I must also insist, that there be no more Smoking in the Middle of the Company, lest the Stink of the Tobacco should drive some of the Fair Guests into the more private Walks for a little fresh Air, and Conversation may then perhaps grow unaccountably serious. I could wish likewise, that they who take Water at White-Hall, would not make too frequent Visits there, at least not in the same Party.


As for the honest Citizens, who carry their Wives and Families there for an Evening's Entertainment, I would by no Means stint them in their Diversions; upon Condition, that the good Lady promises not to fall too much in Love with Musick, nor teaze her Husband next Winter to carry her to the Opera.


Under these Restraints I can admit it for a passa tempo, and am glad Fashion has introduced one so reasonable.   A. Z.


Common Sense no.73, June 24, 1738, p.1, reprinted in The London Magazine and Monthly Chronologer, London: T. Astley, July 1738, p.339.

Friday, January 3, 2020

1738 Ode to Handel's Statue at Vauxhall

Odes to Roubiliac's Statue of Handel

Roubiliac's statue of Handel, as shown in the Illustrated London News in 1859

Upon Handel's Statue being placed in Spring-Garden at Vaux-Hall
As in debate the tuneful sisters stood,
In what sequester'd shade, or hallow'd wood,
Should Handel's statue (musick's master!) stand,
In which fair art well mimick's nature's hand;
Thus spoke the god, that with enliv'ning rays,
Glads the whole earth, and crowns the bard
"Here bid the marble rise, be this the place,
"The haunt of ev'ry muse, and ev'ry grace;
"Where harmony resides, and beauties rove:
"Where should he stand but in Apollo's grove?"

May 1738 in the Literary Courier of Grub-street, and in the London Magazine

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

1738 A Visit to Vauxhall Gardens - A Moral Tale about how easy it is for a Girl to lose her Honor

Caution recommended in the Choice of our Diversions. Lucinda's Case. Vaux-Hall Gardens, &c. (1)

I cannot conclude without taking some Notice of the Diversion of the Year: The Multitudes who resort daily to Vaux-Hall make it necessary to say somewhat upon that Entertainment.

The Gardens are prettily disposed, and when illumined make a beautiful Scene; the Variety of Company differently employ'd, the Contrast between the instrumental Musick in the middle Grove, and the natural Harmony of the Woods, in the more 
retired Parts, render the Whole a very agreeable Amusement. As I am in Hopes too the Warbling of the Nightingales, and the Verdure of the Trees, may tend to reclaim to a Toleration of the Country such of the Fair Sex as are at this Time preparing to leave this Metropolis, I am contented to let them go thither, but under the following Restrictions, viz.

That their Parties always consist of an odd Number. There is something in the Garden which so much resembles the Description of a Mahometan Paradise, that perhaps, if they should be suffered to go in Pairs, they may be tempted to imitate all the Diversions of such a Place. I must also insist, that there be no more Smoking in the Middle of the Company, lest the Stink of the Tobacco should drive some of the Fair Guests into the more private Walks for a little fresh Air, and Conversation may then perhaps grow unaccountably serious. I could wish likewise, that they who take Water at White-Hall, would not make too frequent Visits there, at least not in the same Party.

As for the honest Citizens, who carry their Wives and Families there for an Evening's Entertainment, I would by no Means stint them in their Diversions; upon Condition, that the good Lady promises not to fall too much in Love with Musick, nor teaze her Husband next Winter to carry her to the Opera.

Under these Restraints I can admit it for a passa tempo, and am glad Fashion has introduced one so reasonable.

A. Z.

(1) At the end of a piece on people going to concerts just for the sake of fashion, and not because they want to hear the music, and a moral tale about how easy it is for a girl to lose her honour at private parties

Common Sense no.73, June 24, 1738, p.1, reprinted in The London Magazine and Monthly Chronologer, London: T. Astley, July 1738, p.339.

also in collected annual volume Common Sense: or, the Englishman's Journal, II( London: J. Purser, 1739) p.127-8, Saturday 24 June, 1738

Monday, December 30, 2019

1737 A Trip to Vauxhall Gardens

A TRIP TO VAUX-HALL: Or, A General SATYR on the TIMES. WITH SOME EXPLANATORY NOTES.

By HERCULES MAC-STURDY, of the County of Tiperary, Esq;

Spectatum veniunt, veniunt spectentur ut ipsae
                                                                      OVID
—O Fortuna ut nunquam perpetuo es bona!
                                                                     TERENCE
LONDON:PRINTED FOR A. MOORE, near St. Paul's, and Sold at the Pamphlet-Shops of London and
Westminster. Price One Shilling. MDCCXXXVII


To please two Punks, who freely share their Bounties;
Mercantile one, and one a rampant Countess,
Who taste, without reserve, each tempting Joy
And whom Love's luscious Banquet ne'er can cloy;
Our Vehicle prepar'd at Whitehall Stairs, 
And both the Whores deckt out in all their Airs;
Lolling in State with one on either Side,
And gently falling, with the Wind and Tide;
Last Night, the Evening of a sultry Day,
I sail'd, triumphant, on the liquid Way,
To hear the Fiddlers of Spring-Gardens play;
To see the Walks, Orchestra, Colonades;
The Lamps and Trees in mingled Lights and Shades.
The Scene so new, with Pleasure and Surprise,
Feasted awhile our ravished Ears and Eyes.
The motley Croud we next with Care survey,
The Young, the Old, the Splenetic and Gay:
The Fop emasculate, the rugged Brave,
All jumbled here, as in the common Grave.
Here sat a Group of 'Prentices, and there
The (1) awkard Daughters of a late Lord Mayor;
Next them a Country Bumpkin and his Cousin,
And, stuck about, Red-Ribbon'd Knights a Dozen;
Like ruddy Pinks, or Gilly-flowers in Pots;
'Mongst Bawds, and Rakes, and Sempstresses and Sots.

          Here sits my Lord with Vest of Gold emboss'd;
And there his Taylor sighing for the Cost.
One Month will see him to that Prison sent
Where, six Months pass'd, his Lordship's (2) Butcher went.
His Children starving on the Parish Care,
My Lord has left them now no better Fare.
No Matter—tho' he's in the Butcher's Books,
His Bills unpaid, not so his new French Cooks;
Besides my Lord, when he was to be paid,
Had lost six Hundred Pounds at th' Masquerade.
Had given Faranelli fifty more,
And laid out twenty in a Monkey for his Whore.
What are to him the Pangs of Vulgar Souls!
No thought of those a Noble's Joys controuls.
Let petty Cheats, who drive in humble Hack,
Dread Duns, they've no Protection to their Back.
But to return, and ramble round the Gardens,
His Lordship's Morals leave, not worth five Farthings.

          And meet (3) two Parsons, kept at constant Hire,
Domestick Chaplains of my Landlord T- - - - -, 
Who, waddling with a Load of Guts before 'em,
Are, by their holy Looks to keep Decorum.
For whatsoe're the Doctors do in private,
No open Vice, but one,* they will connive at.

          The doating Cit here hugs his wanton Wife,
Calls her his Sweeting, Fubsey, Duck and Life,
Nor grudges Ham, tho' (4) fourteen Pence an Ounce,
Whilst Horns she's making o'er the Cuckold's Sconce:
But to the Captain gives such am'rous Leers,
As shew her Heart in his, and not her Dear's.
Tho' to this Grocer but two Winters wed,
Three 'Prentices at Home have shar'd his Bed;
Abroad six honest Countrymen of mine;
And of the Army Blades some thirty-nine.

          See yonder gay Flirtilla laughing walk,
And with embroider'd Strephon seems to talk;
Each Syllable she utters, hollows loud,
She answers him, but speaks to all the Croud.
This Couple for each other are design'd,
But she is making Love to all Mankind.
And he, whose only View in Wedlock's Pelf,
Can find no Charms in any but Himself.
The dear, dear Looking-Glass, his sole Delight,
No others Eyes so black, no Teeth so white.

          Next these is haughty Zara, moving slow, 
The Company, she says, are mean and low:
Wonders, Good Heaven! how she chanc'd to come,
'Mong such a Mob, so very far from Home:
This may seem decent Pride - but not to all,
'Cause some have known her Father's Cobling (5) Stall.

          Observe with what a fond paternal Care,
Yon courteous Knight beholds his Son and Heir;
Pleas'd with his stupid Look, in Rapture cries,
In Time this Boy'll teach Wisdom to the Wise!
His Brilliant Parts in Time shall Nations glad;
In short, he'll be the Picture of his Dad,
My Lady laughing in her Sleeve this while,
Casts on the real Dad an am'rous Smile;
But's somewhat shock'd her Hero to explore,
Pent up in (6) Coop with forty Footmen more:
Oh that I were, cries she, with honest Saul,
Taller than other Men, or with 'em all!
But barr'd from thence she turns her View,
On the smug Waiter, with his Apron blue;
The painted Tin upon his rising Crest,
Pleases her Sight, and warms her am'rous Breast.
Not the blue Ribbon, with fam'd Edward's Star,
Can with this Tapster's Clout and Badge compare,
At Home, perhaps, with more than common Joy,
She'll hug her Knight, whilst dreaming of this Toy.
He to reward her Love, and keep it still,
Next Morn presents some Jewel or some Bill,
This sold or chang'd, Eftsoons a Part is sent
To Tom, who guess'd last Night, at what she meant.
An Assignation's made by trusty Nancy,
Unless some other Slave first strikes her Fancy.

          The Knight, his Lady and their hopeful Son,
Thus reconnoitred, let us now pass on,
And fix'd our Eyes upon a (7) Man of Worship,
Who runs a-muck, and worries Men, as Curs Sheep.
Who gets by daily Warrants daily Bread,
The Benches Honour, and his Neighbour's Dread.
Emblem of Justice! ruling in the Dark,
Who neither reads nor writes but sets his Mark,
And leaves all learned Drudg'ry to his Clerk.
This Man who traded once in Soap and Candles,
Now all the Business of his Parish handles,
Handles indeed! but roughly you may say,
And, to increase his Wealth, makes Beggars pay.
No Stocks nor Whipping-Post but can declare
His Mercy to all Wretches in Despair.

          What Grizzly Forms are these, who Centry stand,
With glouting Looks, and Mopstick in one Hand?
Priests of DIANA, set to guard the Grove
'Gainst VENUS and her Son, the God of Love:
For such the furious Heat of English Dames,
And such the Swains ungovernable Flames,
That yet they any how but under Shelter,
Shameless! they'll all go to it helter skelter.

          See modest Fulvia, how demure she sits!
One Word indecent throws her into Fits;
The Touch of Man will discompose her quite,
Yet in the Water she indur'd the Sight,
Nor could the Fan display'd conceal her strong Delight.
With Head oft turning to the fading Shore,
She looks, and looks, till she can see no more;
Unless some other Triton of the Flood
Starts up to charm her with a Scene as good.
Again her Eye-Balls roll, her Soul's on Fire,
Nor Thames himself can quench her hot Desire.
With Fulvia's Modesty exactly suits
The Virtue of her Brothers, those two Brutes,
Who,(8) both in Places, each a large Estate,
Behold their Father thro' a Prison-Grate.

          Of swarthy JEWS, next these, a greasy Croud,
Against Extortion are declaiming loud;
'Tis hard to give a Shilling none knows why,
The wet was right, but damn the Shilling dry.
The Thing's too serious to be nam'd in Scoff,
'Twas just put on when't should be taken off.
Musick may be, perhaps, of Love the Food,
But right old Port or Florence Wine's as good.
They wonder'd what the Christian Jew could mean!
But had these stiff-neck'd Israelites e'er seen,
And seen, could any how contrive to read
The (9) cogent Reasons why this Law's decreed;
They'd own them full of Truth, and Wit, and Sense;
And far out-doing Tully's Eloquence:
The Vaux-hall Style so pure, no Sentence harsh,
That Rome and Athens now must yield to Lambeth-Marsh.
Rot his Reas'ning (cries Friend Abr'ham,) all Stuff!
Forge Tickets in ten Minutes! Time enough.
Then to proclaim his Waiters Rogues aloud!
Why not? You'll find more Rogues among the Croud.
Your Pocket may be pick'd by some (10) lac'd Lord;
If so, the Caution's good, and safe's the Word.

          But why this Rout about a lousy Shilling?
Keep out, and sh----t, cries T-- if you're not willing.
In England now can Musick be too dear,
The Fiddles of all Italy transplanted here?
They strive to charm not Souls that grudge their Chink:
And Musick ne'er was fram'd for Men who think:
Or would so many thoughtless Boobies run
To squeaking Op'ra's till they're half undone?
Or Ladies worship Farri as a God?
Who, say some Criticks, rather is a Rod,
Or Scourge to lash the Follies of the Age,
And drive all Sense and Virtue from the Stage.


(1) These Ladies have exposed themselves pretty much of late.

(2) This Story is too well known to need any Explanation.

(3) Two Reverend Gentlemen are commonly walking there; but what is said of their being the House Chaplains, may be apocryphal.

* It's thought the Author by that one means HYPOCRISY

(4) This is pretty near the Price

(5) Not far from Newgate-Street

(6) A Kind of Kennel made on purpose for the Footmen

(7) It may not be safe to mention his Name

(8) One in the Army

(9) Vide, London Daily Post

(10) We have heard of a certain P--r, who stole a Bank Bill of one Hundred Pounds 

Thursday, December 26, 2019

1737 Poem on the Ridotto al Fresco, in Vauxhall Garden

On the Ridotto al Fresco, in Vauxhall Garden

 Published first in Memoirs of the Society of Grub Street, vol. II (London: J. Wilford, 1737), p. 302
   
Ye Nymphs and Swains who love the Sport,
And value Reputation;
Come boldly all to Venus' Court,
There no prim Justices resort;
Or none for Reformation.

For now so pious are we grown,
A Girl that's common civil,
Dares hardly shew her Face in Town,
But skulks in Corners up and down,
As tho' her Deeds were evil.

Then Thanks to those of gen'rous Soul,
Who prompted by good Reason;
Have found a Way without Controul,
The Ardour of the Blood to cool,
So heighten'd by the Season.

But still the Virtue of the Age
Appears, ev'n in our Leudness;
For, tutor'd, by the modest Stage,
At least we keep from bare-fac'd Rage,
Because 'tis reckon'd Rudeness.

In Town this Trick has long got Ground
Of amorous Masquerading:
The Reason's good, for all around
Was nought but Masquerading found,
In every other Trading.

Nay, this is not the first (Folks say,)
Has been beyond the Water;
For there, Fame tells us, ev'ry Day
Some Masques are seen, tho' not so gay,
And of more canting Nature.

Then you, who wisely right and wrong
By Fashion always measure,
To save your Credit, join the Throng;
And you, who for that Same may long,
Come for the sake of Pleasure.

Of something new we here can't fail,
If you'll defy all Dangers;
For tho' perhaps the Face be stale,
Man may find his Spouse's Tail,
As new, as any Stranger's.

So in the Bow'rs of Ida, Jove
Once met his Wife and Sister,
In Masquerade; and tho' her Love
Had long since ceas'd his Heart to move
He could not then resist her. (1)
O State of Bliss, by Laws not chain'd !
Which all the World wou'd share in,
Had Eve but from the Fruit restrain'd
Who rove in this fam'd Garden.

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Sports & Games - A most elegant 1736 game of Skittles accompanied by Music

Johan Franz Hörmannsperger (Austrian, 1710-?) Music and Bowling 1736 from his private album shows artist/tailor bowling in a Baroque garden on the weekend with his tailor friends. Album of the Imperial blanket maker J. F. Hörmannsperger. Baroque pattern book and album of the blanket maker Johann Franz Hörmannsperger. Vienna. A unique document of late Baroque craftsmanship among the urban Third Estate. These gouaches showing the self-assured 26 year-old author practicing his trade in his workshop, advertising and selling his wares to customers, as well as playing music and even bowling. Inscription for this image: "All gay and jolly, for we are journeymen of the trade: and so the virgins may be; they will not be bored - here is red wine and white, so well we may make merry."

Sunday, December 22, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - The Mock Doctor or Dumb Lady Cur'd. Scene 9th.

Vauxhall The Mock Doctor or Dumb Lady Cur'd. Scene 9th.; print by Carington Bowles after Francis Hayman

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who begun his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.

Friday, December 20, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - Print of Playing the game at Quadrille

Vauxhall Playing the game at Quadrille; (After); 1743; London print after Francis Hayman 

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who begun his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - Print of Falstaff's Cowardice Detected

Vauxhall Falstaff's Cowardice Detected, From Shakespeare's King Henry IV; Carington Bowles after Francis Hayman. London

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who begun his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.

Monday, December 16, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - Cricket

Vauxhall Cricket; print; Antoine Benoist print by John Bowles after Francis Hayman. London

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who begun his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.

Saturday, December 14, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - Building Houses with Cards

Vauxhall Building Houses with Cards; print after Francis Hayman 

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who begun his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - Stealing a kiss

Vauxhall Stealing a kiss; print; Carington Bowles after Francis Hayman; London

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who began his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

1735 Francis Hayman's (1708-1776) Vauxhall Paintings - The King & Miller of Mansfield

Vauxhall The King & Miller of Mansfield; print after Francis Hayman 

William Hogarth (1697-1764) was an English artist, pictorial satirist, and social critic who probably conferred with Vauxhall Gardens owner Jonathan Tyers about using contemporary visual art in his garden decorations. Hogarth had established the St Martin's Lane school of art in 1735, training painters, sculptors, architects and designers. Hogarth introduced Tyers to his close associate, the theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). 
Theatrical scene painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776).  Francis Hayman was an English painter born in Exeter, who began his artistic career as a scene painter in London's Drury Lane Theatre. He was influenced by the French Rococo style & achieved some acclaim during the 1740s for decorative paintings executed for the supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens. Some of his Vauxhall paintings were of Shakespearean scenes. He contributed 31 pictures to a 1744 edition of Shakespeare's plays by Sir Thomas Hanmer.  In the 1760s, Hayman was once again commissioned by Jonathan Tyers, proprietor of Vauxhall Gardens and the Denbies estate, to paint a series of large-scale history paintings depicting British victories in the Seven Years' War. Hayman became Tyers's artistic director for several decades, designing painted decorations for each of the 50 or more "supper-boxes" created within the colonnades that bordered the Grove, and producing at least 8 large oil paintings to decorate 2 of Tyers's main buildings – 4 Shakespearean scenes in the Prince's Pavilion, plus 4 huge canvases of British victories in the Seven Years' War in the Pillared Saloon. All of these paintings were intended to show aspects of the British way of life – its rural games; its theater & literature; its urban amusements; its traditions; and its military prowess. Many of these pleasure garden paintings also carried a concealed moral message.